Soy protein in low protein diets increases cardioprotection in patients with CKD


December 21, 2022

1 minute read

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Milovanova does not report related financial disclosures.

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Soy protein and keto analogues of essential amino acids provided greater renoprotective and cardioprotective effects than a conventional low-protein diet in patients with stage 3b to 4 chronic kidney disease, researchers reported.

“Based on our results, the inclusion of soy protein in the diet of patients with chronic kidney disease promoted the maintenance of muscle mass, slowed the decline in putative glomerular filtration rate, left ventricular hypertrophy, augmentation index, Serum levels of urea, cholesterol, and phosphorus are lowered.” Lyudmila Yu Mirovanova, doctorate, MD, A professor and colleague of the Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University wrote: Journal of Renal Nutrition.

kidney and heart

Soy protein and keto analogues of essential amino acids provided greater renoprotective and cardioprotective effects in patients with stage 3b to 4 chronic kidney disease than a conventional low-protein diet. Source: Adobe Stock.

In a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study, investigators studied 85 patients with CKD stages 3b to 4, aged 18 to 65 years, who were adhering to a low-protein diet combined with keto analogues of essential amino acids (KA), Conventional low-protein diet vs diet containing predominantly soy protein and renal and cardioprotective in CKD.

For 12 months, researchers monitored 43 patients on a low-protein diet containing soy protein and KA, and 42 other patients on a conventional low-protein diet containing animal protein and KA. .

Researchers used bioimpedance analysis to measure nutritional status, measuring BMI, total fat mass, and muscle mass. Measurements also included eGFR, serum calcium, phosphorus, and PTH levels, central systolic blood pressure, valve calcification, left ventricular hypertrophy, and augmentation index.

Milovanova et al found that substituting soy protein for low-protein diets in CKD patients delayed the decline in eGFR (-5.9% vs. -11.3%; P. = .048), lean body mass for both men (0.9% vs -11.2%; P. = .017) and women (–1.8% vs –10.3%; P. = .024). On the other hand, the soy protein diet also slowed the increase in left ventricular hypertrophy (4.7% vs 12.3%; P. = .042), central systolic blood pressure (2.6% vs 13%; P. = .021), enhancement index (7.6% vs 23.3%; P. = .010), phosphorus (–10.3% vs 13%; P. = .029), cholesterol (–10.7% vs. –3.4%; P. = .047), urea (6.3% vs 19.6%; P. = .035) and serum levels.

“[Soy protein] Substitution of animal protein in pre-dialysis CKD patients may improve renal function[protective] The cardioprotective potential of a low-protein diet,” write Milovanova and colleagues.



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