Diet and Exercise Intervention Better for Pain in Knee Osteoarthritis – Consumer Health News


Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) — In overweight or obese patients with knee osteoarthritis, diet and exercise may reduce knee pain at 18 months, compared to attention controls results in a statistically significant difference, according to a study published in the December 13 issue of Journal of the American Medical Association.

Stephen P. Messier, Ph.D., of Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, and colleagues conducted a randomized clinical trial in patients with knee osteoarthritis and overweight or obesity over the age of 50. . A total of 823 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to a diet and exercise intervention or attention control group (his 414 and his 409 participants, respectively) for 18 months.

The researchers found that the adjusted mean pain scores of the Western Ontario University and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index were 5.0 and 5.5, respectively, in the diet, exercise and attention control groups at 18 months follow-up. found (adjusted difference, -0.6). Five of the seven secondary endpoints were significantly better in the intervention group compared to the control group. The unadjusted 18-month mean change in body weight was -7.7 kg and -1.7 kg (8 percent and 2 percent) in the diet, exercise and attention control groups, respectively. Overall, there were 169 serious adverse events, none of which were clearly related to the study.

“The 7.7kg (8%) weight loss combined with a 9cm reduction in waist circumference in the diet and exercise group may provide health benefits for older adults with knee osteoarthritis.” The authors write

One author disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical industry.

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